Wonder Woman

I’ve been on a bit of a superhero kick recently. My husband got me hooked on Arrow and The Flash, we watched all the Avengers movies in order recently (although we still haven’t seen the newest Spiderman), and we saw Wonder Woman of course. One of Book Riot’s challenges is to read a Superhero Comic with a female lead, so a Wonder Woman story was the obvious choice. Having seen the movie I knew a tiny bit about Wonder Woman’s story but still had to google various characters. Also, since Arrow and The Flash are in the D.C. Universe I kept trying to make connections there that didn’t exist.

I’m glad I read Wonder Woman: Volume One: The Lies, but I can’t say I really enjoyed it. First off, the story is super confusing since Diana doesn’t know what is a true memory anymore and what is legend and what is someone sabotaging her memory. So as readers, especially someone new to the storyline, I had no idea either. Which is mostly fine, but then we never find out! I know the story has to continue on to the next volume, but some closure would be nice.

Lastly, I didn’t realize that comics often have different artists, so throughout the volume the art changed and the characters looked different. It wasn’t hugely problematic, but it was annoying.

Book Riot Reading Challenge: A superhero comic with a female lead

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book becoming a movie in 2017

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The Romance Reader’s Guide to Life

I can’t quite pinpoint why this book took me so long to read. At one point I even marked at DNF on Goodreads. For one thing, it is slightly more violent than I had expected. Somehow I must have missed the murder portion of the book blurb. With that said, it isn’t a particularly violent book, just different than I had expected. Pretty sure I saw the pretty cover, read “pirate,” and skipped the rest of the description.

The Romance Reader’s Guide to Life by Sharon Pywell centers around two sisters- Lilly and Neave (which I never really figured out how to pronounce)- who are very close and very different. Lilly is flighty and interested in fun while Neave is awkward and prefers spending time with books to people, especially The Pirate Lover, a romance novel she took from an elderly neighbor.

As the two sisters grow older they start their own cosmetics business, in the same vein as Mary Kay and Avon, and Lilly finds herself involved with a charming and manipulative man. When she dies, it’s up to dead Lilly in the beyond, with the help of the old faithful family dog, to save Neave.

The story of Lilly and Neave is interspersed with chapters from the romance novel Neave reads over and over. I hate to admit this, since it shows you just how dense I can be, but I didn’t realize until the last few chapters that the plot of the The Pirate Lover and the main story mirror each other.

Appleblossom the Possum

Appleblossom the Possum by Holly Goldberg Sloan is one of this years Maud Hart Lovelace nominees. I’m going to try and read them all this year. I totally failed last year. It helps that many of them fulfill my other reading challenge categories.

The Goodreads blurb reads “Mama has trained up her baby possums in the ways of their breed, and now it’s time for all of them—even little Appleblossom—to make their way in the world. Appleblossom knows the rules: she must never be seen during the day, and she must avoid cars, humans, and the dreaded hairies (sometimes known as dogs). Even so, Appleblossom decides to spy on a human family—and accidentally falls down their chimney! The curious Appleblossom, her faithful brothers—who launch a hilarious rescue mission—and even the little girl in the house have no idea how fascinating the big world can be. But they’re about to find out!”

I should find this little book cute. But I didn’t. I may have mentioned a couple years ago that I lived in an old house and squirrels and one chipmunk managed to find their way inside. Finding chipmunk poop on your sofa is not cute. Ever since then these kinds of stories gross me out. I’m fine reading about the Possums outside, but once Appleblossom falls into the “people house” I was in yuck mode. Despite my aversions, the illustrations are adorable, and I can see kids really enjoying this book.

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book from a nonhuman perspective

Behind Her Eyes

I’m not even sure where to begin this one! A friend of mine wrote about this book on her blog a while back and I put it on hold at the library. Months later I finally get a copy and I have completely forgotten why I put it on hold in the first place. I know I’m not actually going to read it, so I send it off to the next person in the line. Fast forward what feels like a month or two, but in reality was probably a week, maybe two, and I start reading and hearing all about Grip Lit. Suddenly I have a huge desire to read a Grip Lit novel and the only one available to me on Cloud Library is Behind Her Eyes. I started reading and could not stop. I finished in just over 24 hours.

Behind Her Eyes tells the story of Louise, a single mother in London who has a one night stand with a guy on a rare night at the bar. Later she discovers that man is her new boss, David. When she runs into her boss’s wife and starts up an unlikely friendship, Louise finds herself drawn more and more into the mysterious lives of David and Adele. What secrets are they hiding? Why does Adele seems so afraid of David? Why doesn’t Adele have any other friends?

While the writing wasn’t amazing or anything and the whole plot basically revolves around Louise making stupid choices, it definitely kept me on the edge of my seat. I thought I had it all figured out too (parts of the story reminded me of Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger), but then that last chapter came… and all I can say is WOW!

If you’re looking for something that will suck you in, and maybe break that reading lull you’re going through (I’m still off and on the reading bandwagon recently) this is the book for you!

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book with an unreliable narrator

Modern Mrs. Darcy Challenge: A book in a genre you usually avoid

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid was wonderful! It’s been awhile since a book sucked me in so quickly. There’s something so fascinating and yet relatable about Evelyn. Doesn’t hurt that I’m a sucker for historical fiction and I love old movies… Monique on the other hand, was a needed character, but she had no personality whatsoever. I generally skimmed her parts.

However, my brain is hurting today, so I’m copying and pasting the blurb from Goodreads:

From Taylor Jenkins Reid comes an unforgettable and sweeping novel about one classic film actress’s relentless rise to the top—the risks she took, the loves she lost, and the long-held secrets the public could never imagine.

Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated. Regardless of why Evelyn has chosen her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jump start her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way. As Evelyn’s life unfolds through the decades—revealing a ruthless ambition, an unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love—Monique begins to feel a very a real connection to the actress. But as Evelyn’s story catches up with the present, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.

Filled with emotional insight and written with Reid’s signature talent, this is a fascinating journey through the splendor of Old Hollywood into the harsh realities of the present day as two women struggle with what it means—and what it takes—to face the truth.

I don’t want to ruin anything for those who haven’t read it yet, but there are a few big twists, about which I’d like to hear others’ opinions. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo was also a huge departure from Reid’s other works (granted I’ve only read two of them). And I think she did a great job! Maybe it was just the subject matter, but it reminded me a bit of Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walters, which I also loved. I guess this is telling me that I need to read more fiction about the golden age of cinema.

PopSugar Reading Challenge: A Book set in two time periods

Modern Mrs. Darcy Reading Challenge: Read three book by the same author (Maybe in Another LifeAfter I Do, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo)

Book Riot Read Harder Challenge: an LGBTQ Romance Novel

One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter

I toyed with the idea of signing up for Book of the Month back in April. Ultimately, I decided not to join, but if I had, I would have gone with One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter by Scaachi Koul, partially because it fits a Book Riot Read Harder category and partially because the cover and title are awesome, but mostly because I was intrigued. I really enjoy books of essays, although I rarely read them.

While I really enjoyed One Day We’ll All Be Dead, it did take me a while to finish. I’d tear through one essay and then not be motivated to pick the book up again until lunch three days later and so on and so on. Even though it took me a long time to finish the collection, I really enjoyed it. Koul is an amazing writer, and very clearly highlights the racial and gender issues so common in our society, while also making you snort with laughter.

“Nothing bad can happen to you if you’re with your mom. Your mom can stop a bullet from lodging in your heart. She can prop you up when you can’t. You mom is your blood and bone before your body even knows how to make any.”

I found myself vacillating from shock to laughter to almost crying to laughter again and again. For me, Koul’s writing is strongest when writing about her family, and as someone who worries about her parents and who has a strong relationship with her mother, I can really empathize with many aspects of these essays.

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book written by someone you admire

Book Riot Read Harder Challenge: A collection of stories by a woman

Modern Mrs. Darcy: A book of any genre that addresses current events

 

I’ve Got Your Number

When I first saw the “book you bought on a trip” prompt for the PopSugar Reading Challenge I knew I had to re-read I’ve Got Your Number. I don’t often think of myself as a “chick lit” person. I don’t particularly like the rest of Sophie Kinsella’s books (the plot of the Shopaholic series annoys me in general) nor do I enjoy Emily Griffin or Jen Lancaster. But, I do like Lauren Willig and her Pink Carnation series is basically historical chick lit and I love I’ve Got Your Number.

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British Cover

I visited a friend of mine while she was living in Mozambique and we met in South Africa to go on a safari. Our safari ended in Durban, South Africa and we had to take a public bus from Durban to Maputo. My iPad battery died and therefore all of my bus entertainment, so I decided I had to have a physical  book for the bus ride instead of reading on my iPad. Off to the local bookstore we went and I picked up the paperback copy of I’ve Got Your Number (side note, I like the British cover much better than the American). I devoured the book on the bus ride and then promptly began it again the day after finishing.

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American Cover

I can’t quite describe what I like about the, because Poppy is such wackadoo. She makes some seriously questionable choices. Yet, I’ve read or listened to this book maybe four times now in the last 4 years. So there is obviously something that draws me into the crazy. Maybe it’s the British-ness. Maybe it’s the somewhat normal-ness of Poppy, even if she is a wackadoo (the plot of the book is wildly unrealistic) or maybe it’s because Kinsella has a way of creating characters you root for, even if they drive you nuts.

Luckily for me, all my other reading challenges have a “book you’ve already read” prompt, so I got to check off lots of prompts with one old favorite.