Baby Storytime: 22

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

“Open Them, Shut Them”

Action Rhyme:

“Where is Thumbkin?” (twice, followed by “Where is Family?”

Book:

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Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr.

Song:

If You’re Happy and You Know It

Feltboard:

Down by the Bay

Shared Book

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The Crayon’s Book of Colors by Drew Daywalt

Song:

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

Action Rhyme:

“Did You Ever See a Baby”

Did you ever see a baby,

a baby, a baby?

Did you ever see a baby,

Go this way and that? (rock side to side)

That way and this way. (rock back and forth)

Did you ever see a baby, (rock side to side)

Go this way and that?

Closing Song

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Baby Storytime: 21

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

Open Them, Shut Them

Book:

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Pete the Cat Five Little Ducks by James Dean

Feltboard:

Down by the Bay

Action Rhyme:

“One arm and one leg”

One arm goes up,

One arm goes down.

One arm goes up and down.

Two arms go up,

Two arms go down.

Two arms go up and down.

One leg goes up,

One leg goes down.

One leg goes up and down.

Two legs go up,

Two legs go down.

Two legs go up and down.

Two arms and two legs go up.

Two arms and two legs go down.

Two arms and two legs go up and down.

Shared Book:

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My Car by Byron Barton

Song:

Wheels on the Bus

Book:

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Fire Truck by Peter Sis

Closing Song

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt Storywalk

Last week I accomplished one of my professional goals. Since starting in public libraries I wanted to run a We’re Going on a Bear Hunt storywalk, through nature that somewhat resembles the scenes in the book. My current library is working on a partnership with a local nature center (we want more outreach, they want more visitors, so win-win!) and another librarian and I jumped at the chance to start this journey. I brought up my Bear Hunt idea and they loved it, and the site just happened to have a master naturalist volunteer who had already created a bear game, a bear den, and a box of bear paraphernalia (plaster prints, bear skin, etc). The nature center even has bears living on their property and have trail-cam photos of the bears.

Bear Hunt

I got to nature center at noon on a Wednesday and helped set up the non-trail portion of the event. We had a corner set up for kids to read to stuffed bears and a basket of other fabulous bear books. We also had a binocular making station, coloring sheets, and a “map” with early literacy tips for parents on the back.

Not only was I impressed by the turnout, but by how long some of our Bear Hunters took on their walk. Some were on the trail for an hour! They then stayed and made binoculars or colored or read for another hour or two.

I’m super excited to continue this partnership and hope that the upcoming nature storywalks are just as successful. And I was so excited to see something I’d thought about for years come to life.

Farmers Market Storytimes

I love farmers markets. I don’t always buy stuff (except flowers), but I love the idea. This year, some librarians joined me in promoting the library at the farmers market. We’re lucky enough to work in a community where the farmers market organizers reached out to us first. I love that other organizations also want to partner with library and it’s not always us reaching out to them. Especially when I get to sit outside.

When I went to the farmers market I ran a storytime of sorts. I never had kids all at the same time, so it was mostly a “who wants to hear a story?” kind of situation, and I’d read books throughout my time at the market. At my last job I tried doing farming/vegetable/food related stories, but those are all long and not particularly engrossing. Especially when the storytime is surrounded by other more interesting distractions. So I went with some tried and true silly favorites. By far the most popular books I read were:

Is Everyone Ready for Fun? by Jan Thomas

New Socks by Bob Shea

Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems (surprise, surprise)

ACT Prep

As chair of my library system’s Teen Team, I created and led an ACT Prep class at my library a few Saturdays ago. One of our goals as a team is to encourage work and college readiness, in addition to encourage reading etc. Lucky for me, there is a great resource called Learning Express, and it actually has study guides, practice tests, flashcards, and breaks down the various parts of the test.

I showed attendees how to create an account and we clicked through the study resources in the website. They then took practice quizzes (you can take the full practice ACT Test or practice quizzes, and since we had 1.5 hours and not 3+ we did practice quizzes), and took notes on what they needed to practice. The other great thing about this resource, is everything is saved in your account. So if one of my attendees didn’t finish the science quiz, he or she could go home and log in (or go into the library after the program and log in) and finish the quiz, and they could do that as many times as needed!

I then went over some testing guidelines from the ACT website, like what calculators are allowed and where in our area the test is offered. While I can’t say the kids had fun at the program, it certainly was informative!

Cream of the Crop

Last week I took a class for my never ending journey towards a certificate in Children’s Lit. Why this seems like a never ending journey is a story for another day. However, it was interesting to discuss the merits of the different youth literature awards and their purpose. For homework we all read books that won various awards or were honor books for their years. I read George by Alex Gino and The War that Saved My Life by Jennifer Brubaker Bradley.

As the only public librarian in the class, the instructor thought I’d have an advantage over the rest of the class in familiarity with the various awards. I did know more than the rest of the class, but I’m not sure why a public librarian knows about more awards than school librarians. I guess I understand knowing more categories than teachers, but even that’s a stretch.

Anyway, there are a lot more literary awards out there than I realized. And some seem redundant. There are two nonfiction awards. Why? And the Geisel Award for early readers seems very vague to me. But, maybe that’s just me.

Worth Reading (round 4) and Listening

More things that are worth your while exploring in the land of books and libraries!

Male authors use female(ish) pseudonyms 

In the most recent Book Riot Podcast Jeff and Amanda (Identity Squatting) and Jeff and Rebecca (Don’t @ Me) talk more in depth about men using initials or pseudonyms to attract female readership. While women have done this for many years (see J.K. Rowling and the Bronte Sisters), it feels weird and wrong for men to do it now. Especially since white men are still more likely to get published. Listen to the podcasts because the Book Riot people are much more eloquent than I ever hope to be.

 

Millennials are Keeping Libraries Alive!

“According to a new analysis of Pew Research Center data on US library attendance, millennials more than other generations appear to have a use for physical libraries. They may not always come for the books, but the country’s youngest adults show up.” I’m glad this article mentioned that millennials are the ones with kids and the biggest group I see coming into libraries, no matter where I’ve worked, are families. I can’t say I read all the articles on this stat, that I saw floating around the Twitterverse in the past month, but it seemed to me the parenting aspect was not mentioned often. I think, it would be even more interesting to see how many of these millennials are checking out books for themselves vs their kids. However, computer usage is also way up, whether that’s using our library computers or using library WiFi. That’s where I see the other large chunk of millennial (non-parent) usage.

Regardless, it’s nice to see a headline where Millennials aren’t killing something.

 

Lunch at the Library

“Librarians used to forbid any food or drink to avoid staining books and attracting pests. People who tried to sneak snacks in the stacks would be reprimanded. But in recent years, a growing number of libraries have had a major shift in policy: They are the ones putting food on the table.”