Geronimo!

When I started working in libraries officially, way back in 2012, I had my first introduction to Geronimo Stilton. And he’s still going strong! It’s kind of amazing really. This summer I think we had, on average, two Geronimo or Thea Stilton titles on the shelf at any given time. The rest were all checked out.

Given this popularity, we decided to host a Geronimo Stilton Party.

I started the program with a small craft. Mostly because people are always late, so I didn’t want to dive into anything too complicated and then have to re-explain. Earlier this summer we weeded our music CD collection pretty extensively, so we used the weeded CDs and made mice. The kids colored faces on the back of the CD in sharpie (mistake, since sharpie is still all over our tables) and glued on ears they made.

Once we were done making our mice, I read an excerpt from Geronimo Stilton: Lost Treasure of the Emerald Eye that discussed Geronimo’s career as a journalist. We talked about what it means to be a journalist and why interviewing and getting facts is key. I then split the group up into pairs and handed them an interview sheet (pg 11) from the “Geronimo Stilton Summer Event Kit.” We then went around and shared what we learned about our partner.

Next, I read another excerpt, this time from My Name is Stilton, Geronimo StiltonThe excerpt focused on his new assistant and how she had a scoop and might give it to the competition. We then looked at old newspapers the library was about to recycle. The Twin Cities happens to have two newspapers, so that bit worked out well. We then discussed parts of the paper and I set them off on a newspaper scavenger hunt. Participants had to find: a byline, the date, weather, a map or photograph, a sports score and a letter to the editor. They then cute these out and pasted them onto paper.

All of this took a lot longer than expected, so I sent them home with an origami project and a hieroglyphics work sheet.

Overall, the program was really fun, but as always, I tend to overestimate the skills of the attendees. I had a couple of attendees who were just learning to read so the interview questions were way too hard.

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So Long, Farewell…

Auf Wiedersehen, Good Night…

Although I suppose it really should be Au Revoir and not Auf Wiedersehen. If that’s not clue enough, our favorite fancy character is leaving us! Jane O’Connor, author of the Fancy Nancy series has recently announced that the latest installment will be the last.

In her farewell piece in the New York Times Jane O’Connor recounts fan letters she’s received and anecdotes from book signings, and it’s all so sweet it almost made me cry. Especially this one:

Kids write as if I’m a friend, one with whom they can be frank: “Don’t you think it would be cool if you made another book, not about Fancy Nancy but another girl, like Rockin Roxie or Preppy Patty? I think if you go with my idea you can make a lot of money.”

They confide in me. “Some days when I feel gloomy (that’s fancy for sad), I read one of your books and automatically it cheers me up,” one wrote. Another said: “One day I came home crying. A girl was picking on me because of my clothes. Then on Library Day I discovered the Fancy Nancy books. Because of those books … you helped me to be — well, me.

And this, my friend, is why books are important. Why we need these wonderful authors and why children’s literature should never be scoffed at or taken for granted. 

We’ll miss you Nancy!

Toddler Storytime: Sick and Get Well

Opening Song

“The More We Get Together”

Extra Activities:

Letter Recognition: G. We looked at a green circle, a goose, a giraffe and a ghost.

Book:

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I Broke My Trunk by Mo Willems

Action Rhyme:

“I’ve Got a Cold”

I’ve got a cold (point to self)

My nose can’t smell (point to nose),

My eyes are red (point to eyes).

I don’t feel well (hand on forehead)

So I’ll drink my juice (pretend to drink)

And go to sleep… (fold hands under head)

My nose feels better (point to nose)

And so does my head! (point to head)

credit: SurLaLune Storytime

Book:

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Doctor Maisy by Lucy Cousins

Felt Activity:

I gave each child a different colored felt bandaid and called them up by color, having each child put the bandaid on George, the Library Dog. I asked them to put a bandaid on his nose (like Gerald and Piggie), one on his paws, and one on his tail.

Book:image

Bear Feels Sick by Karma Wilson

Closing Song

Toddler Storytime: Books and Reading

Opening Song

“The More We Get Together”

Extra Activities:

Letter Recognition: R. We looked at a road, a rooster, a rose and a rabbit.

Book:

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Give Me Back My Book! by Ethan Long

Song:

We were a little wiggly so I offered “Hokey Pokey” or “Head Shoulders Knees and Toes.” “Head Shoulders Knees and Toes” won.

Book:

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Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn

Song:

“Read, Read, Read a Book”

(Tune: Row, Row, Row Your Boat)
Read, read, read a book,
Travel anywhere,
Worldwide, you decide,
A book will take you there.
Read, read, read a book,
Beginning to the end,
What a way to spend the day,
A book’s a special friend!

Feltboard:

“Five Little Books”

Five little books at the library
Five little books as great as can be
Along comes (name) with their library card
To take one home and read.

Book:image

Please, Open this Book! by Adam Lehrhaupt

Closing Song

Baby Storytime: 42

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

“Open Them, Shut Them”

Baby Sign:

Hurt

Book:

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Ten Little Fingers, Two Little Hands by Kristy Dempse

Action Rhyme:

“Baby’s Bellybutton”

These are baby’s fingers,

These are baby’s toes,

This is baby’s belly button,

Round and round it goes.

Shared Book

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Baby Faces by Margaret Miller

Feltboard:

“Four Sheep”

Counting sheep, counting sheep,

Helps my mommy fall to sleep.

One sheep, two sheep,

Three sheep, four.

Now my mommy begins to snore.

Action Rhyme:

“Ten Little Chickens”

Five eggs, (hold up one hand)

and Five eggs, (hold up other hand)

Makes ten.

Sitting on top is Mother Hen. (fold one hand over the other)

Crackle, Crackle, Crackle, (clap, clap, clap)

What do I see?

Ten fuzzy chickens, (hold up both hands)

As yellow as can be!

Book:

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Everyone Can Learn to Ride a Bicycle by Chris Raschka

Song:

“Baby Head Shoulders Knees and Toes”

Closing Song

Audiobooks and Empathy

I vividly remember listening to Wild by Cheryl Strayed and bawling while driving (unsafe I know) when she had to shoot her horse to put it out of it’s misery. I also remember sitting in the mall parking lot crying while listening to The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness when Manchee dies  and then having to pull myself together to go inside and make my returns (spoiler in white for those who don’t want to know, high light if you do).

I also remember getting really stressed out while listening to The Circle by Dave Eggers. I can’t exactly pinpoint what stressed me out, but the creepiness and realization that we’re pretty much there in terms of social media (and the plot of the book) made me very uneasy. Similarly, it’s taken me a year(ish) to listen to Caroline: Little House, Revisited (still working on it) but I found myself gripping my steering wheel and getting very nervous about Jack and the ponies and Pa during the river crossing, even though I know what happens, since I read Little House on the Prairie a thousand times growing up.

Why are you telling us this, you ask? To illustrate the reasons why I was not at all shocked that a recent study between UCLA and Audible finds audiobook listeners have a heightened physical response to the narration in comparison to movie and television representations.

According to the study, while the participants reported that the videos were “more engaging” than the audiobooks by about 15% on average, their physiological responses told a different story, with heart rates higher by about two beats a minute, and body temperatures raised by roughly two degrees when listening to audiobooks.

The article, “Listen and Weep: Audiobooks Outdo Films in Emotional Engagement” states the study used books where the film or television adaption is true to the book and “the scenes were chosen based on their ’emotional intensity,’ and for having minimal differences between the audio and video adaptations.”

 

 

 

Toddler Storytime: Ducks

Opening Song

“The More We Get Together”

Extra Activities:

Letter Recognition: D! We looked at a dog, a doll, a drum and a deer.

Book:

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I Can Help by David Hyde Costell

Felt Board:

“Five Little Ducks

Book:

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Ducks Away! by Mem Fox and Judy Horacek

Action Rhyme:

“Ten Little Ducklings”

Ten little ducklings, running at a dash (run in place)

Jumped in the pond, with a great big splash! (pretend to jump in pond)

Then their mother called them, quack, quack, quack!

And the ten little ducklings, came swimming back (pretend to swim).

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Mallards by Margaret Hall

Closing Song