Library Happenings

I am waaaaaayyy behind. I started taking a class and work got nuts, and things just fell to the side. So, to catch up, here are two super fun programs I’ve been working on at the library, and one not so fun one.

Read Across America Day:

Way back in last May (I think) my library got new gates. I hung on to the giant boxes the gates came in because I figured we could make something from them. And we did! For Read Across America Day myself and some staff and some volunteers made puppet theaters out of the gates. We then had stations for kids and families to make Lorax, Fox in Socks and Thing One and Thing Two paper bag puppets. All were a big hit! Although Fox in Socks and the Things were the most popular.

unnamed 23

unnamed 6

unnamed 2 I also had a super special Dr. Seuss storytime that even got filmed by a local news channel! One grandma in the audience said I was the best storyteller she’s seen, and she takes her grandchildren to almost all the libraries in the area. That definitely made my day!

I Survived the Library:

On Saturday, April 1, Natural Disasters struck the my library and our intrepid patrons learned How to Survive. The STEM program, inspired by the popular I Survived books, consisted of 5 five stations. Each station began with a reading of the first chapter of the corresponding book, and discussion about the character, what might happen, etc. unnamed

Stations included:

I Survived the Destruction of Pompeii, AD 79 where attendees learned about the parts of a volcano and created their own volcanic eruption with baking soda, vinegar and dish soap.

I Survived the Japanese Tsunami, 2011 where attendees learned about the 10 most destructive tsunamis in history and mimicked the effects of a tsunami on a fake beach made of corn grits, corn syrup, pebbles and water.

I Survived the Sinking of the Titanic, 1912 where attendees learned about the ship, it’s lack of lifeboats, and tried to build their own unsinkable ships out of tinfoil.

I Survived the San Francisco Earthquake, 1906 where attendees built their own cityscapes out of toothpicks and marshmallows on a base of jello-o and mimicked the effects of an earthquake, after learning about how and why earthquakes occur.

I Survived the Shark Attacks of 1916 where attendees learned about the varieties of sharks and took a trivia quiz on shark behavior.

**can you tell I copied and pasted this from my staff newsletter? I’m all about reusing.

Leadership Training:

As a somewhat new supervisor in my system (1 year, and 1 month at the start of the training) I was signed up for an Integrity in Leadership Training through my county. It’s really interesting learning about the different parts of the county and the various work my colleagues do. It’s also interesting to see how different these areas are (and similar in some cases) and how some managerial tactics might work in the assessor’s office but not in corrections, or how a strict dress code might be necessary in the attorney’s office, but not so much in the highway department.

Anyway, what I have found to be the most beneficial piece of advice from our trainer is this: follow your organization’s mission, and if you do that and work with integrity, you can’t feel badly if people get mad at you. As managers, and as people who work in the public, library managers are never going to please everyone (and as a people pleaser I struggle with this), but if we tailor our work to our library’s mission and work with integrity (treat our tasks, and our people with respect) we can go home knowing we’ve done a job well done and not get upset when people are mad.

This is easier said than done for me, again people pleaser here, but I’m working on it.

Worth Reading: Round 3

As you know, we are living in contentious times. Marches and protests abound, as do accusations of fake news. How does the library fit into this world?

Teen Librarian Toolbox tweeted several suggestions, all of which are posted here. Included are purchase diverse books and create source analysis documents for users.

—–

The University of Minnesota put together an immigration syllabus that “seeks to provide historical context to current debates over immigration reform, integration, and citizenship.”

—–

I created a book review article for our county’s local paper about immigration stories, ranging from current Somali and Hmong immigrant/refugee stories to the Swedish immigration stories of the 1800s. Encouraging our users to read outside of their comfort zone is important.

—–

Many organizations have crafted infographics detailing how to tell if a news source is accurate, biased or fake. IFLA has a nice blog post summarizing the issue and including some resources for libraries.

Mock Caldecott

I attended my very first Mock Caldecott discussion on the 8th (this really delayed, I know). Fortunately, I’d read most of the titles in my rush to read all the Goodreads best of picture books, and in my perusal of other “best of” lists. It’s interesting, however, to note that the actual winner (and only one of the four official honor books was included) was not discussed at all in our meeting. The titles discussed are as follows:

Medal winner: Erin E. Stead for The Uncorker of Ocean Bottles by Michelle Cuevas

Honor: Brendan Wenzel for The All Saw a Cat

Honor: Beth Krommes for Before Morning by Joyce Sidman

Honor: Nick Wroblewski for Wake Up, Island by Mary Casanova

Honor: Yuyi Morales for Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie

Honor: Christian Robinson for School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex

Tessa Blackham for Monday is Wash Day by Maryann Sundby

The Fan Brothers for The Midnight Gardner

Dan Santant for Are we There Yet?

Evan Turk for The Storyteller

While I don’t agree with the winner (I liked Before Morning and School’s First Day of School) much more, the process was fascinating! We each voted for four titles, with a weighted vote (our first choice gets more points etc), so there’s less of a chance for ties. We also discussed in great detail, the gutters, continuity (in School’s First Day of School a little girl draws a picture and on the next page, when it is hung up on the teacher’s bulletin board, the sun has changed locations), and whitespace. Many things I have to admit, I had not looked at before.

Hopefully next year, I can also participate in the Mock Newbery! I hope to be more on top of things this year, read the books as they come out.

Maud Hart Lovelace 2016-2017

Once again I’m going to try and read all the nominees. So far I have two items on my nightstand but I haven’t opened either one… I’m clearly not off to a very good start. Because of this, I’m only going to try and read the Division I nominees. There are several good ones in Division II but I don’t know if I’ll make it that far this year.

Anywho… here are the contenders for 2016-2017:

Division I (grades 3-5)

Almost Home by Joan Bauer

Army of Frogs: A Kulipari Novel by Trevor Pryce

Ava and Pip by Carol Weston

Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin

Capture the Flag by Kate Messner

El Deafo by Cece Bell

Escape by Night by Laurie Myers

The Five Lives of Our Cat Zook by Joanne Rocklin

Kizzy Ann Stamps by Jeri Watts

Nickel Bay Nick by Dean Pitchford

The Secret Chicken Society by Judy Cox

Wild River by P.J. Petersen

Life Lately

This past week in Minnesota, and the rest of the United States, was terrible. The shooting of Philando Castile happened less than 5 miles from my house. I can’t bring myself to drive past the spot, and I certainly cannot even begin to imagine the pain and grief his family, friends, and those who knew him are feeling.

There are many ways to get involved, and work towards peace and justice, but as this is a library blog, I want to share this wonderful editorial by Colin Whitehurst, of Portage District Library in Michigan.

I feel like today more than ever, the Library reminds us that we can work together. We have this place in each of our communities that stands up proud and tall and invites everyone in to be fed emotionally, intellectually, and yes sometimes literally.

And the Winner is…

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Grabenstein. Now, there is another winner for Division II but I didn’t read most of those books. I almost read all of Division I and I am not surprised at all that Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library won.

It’s a great book, my review here, and the interest I saw in the library was amazing. Congrats Chris Grabenstein!

Second Place goes to The Fourth Stall (my review here) and Third Place goes to Summer of the Wolves by Polly Carson Voiles (which I did not read).

I need to start reading next year’s nominees now!

Maud Hart Lovelace Roundup Round 2

Voting ended last Friday (8th) but the winner isn’t announced until April 23rd, so I still have time! Since my last post I crossed two more off the list.

Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman

I kind of wish I’d read it instead of listening, since I missed out on all the awesome illustrations. However, the audio is read aloud by Neil Gaiman himself, so that makes up for a lot. It’s a great story about time travel and imagination, as told by the father who went out to get milk for his children’s cereal.

The Fourth Stall by Chris Rylander

The Fourth Stall certainly kept me on the edge of my seat! I’m torn because I want to like Mac, and sometimes I did, but mostly I didn’t. He makes for a great narrator however, and I really liked the gangster/noir vibe the audio book had. I didn’t notice the noir feeling as much when reading as opposed to listening, but that’s probably because the narrator did such a great job with the stereotypical inflections and stylizing when speaking. However, the narrator gave Vince a very NYC/New Jersey accent which doesn’t fit with the Illinois location.

Not my personal vote for the Maud Hart Lovelace winner, but I can see the appeal.