Baby Storytime: 22

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

“Open Them, Shut Them”

Action Rhyme:

“Where is Thumbkin?” (twice, followed by “Where is Family?”

Book:

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Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr.

Song:

If You’re Happy and You Know It

Feltboard:

Down by the Bay

Shared Book

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The Crayon’s Book of Colors by Drew Daywalt

Song:

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

Action Rhyme:

“Did You Ever See a Baby”

Did you ever see a baby,

a baby, a baby?

Did you ever see a baby,

Go this way and that? (rock side to side)

That way and this way. (rock back and forth)

Did you ever see a baby, (rock side to side)

Go this way and that?

Closing Song

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Baby Storytime: 21

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

Open Them, Shut Them

Book:

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Pete the Cat Five Little Ducks by James Dean

Feltboard:

Down by the Bay

Action Rhyme:

“One arm and one leg”

One arm goes up,

One arm goes down.

One arm goes up and down.

Two arms go up,

Two arms go down.

Two arms go up and down.

One leg goes up,

One leg goes down.

One leg goes up and down.

Two legs go up,

Two legs go down.

Two legs go up and down.

Two arms and two legs go up.

Two arms and two legs go down.

Two arms and two legs go up and down.

Shared Book:

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My Car by Byron Barton

Song:

Wheels on the Bus

Book:

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Fire Truck by Peter Sis

Closing Song

Wonder Woman

I’ve been on a bit of a superhero kick recently. My husband got me hooked on Arrow and The Flash, we watched all the Avengers movies in order recently (although we still haven’t seen the newest Spiderman), and we saw Wonder Woman of course. One of Book Riot’s challenges is to read a Superhero Comic with a female lead, so a Wonder Woman story was the obvious choice. Having seen the movie I knew a tiny bit about Wonder Woman’s story but still had to google various characters. Also, since Arrow and The Flash are in the D.C. Universe I kept trying to make connections there that didn’t exist.

I’m glad I read Wonder Woman: Volume One: The Lies, but I can’t say I really enjoyed it. First off, the story is super confusing since Diana doesn’t know what is a true memory anymore and what is legend and what is someone sabotaging her memory. So as readers, especially someone new to the storyline, I had no idea either. Which is mostly fine, but then we never find out! I know the story has to continue on to the next volume, but some closure would be nice.

Lastly, I didn’t realize that comics often have different artists, so throughout the volume the art changed and the characters looked different. It wasn’t hugely problematic, but it was annoying.

Book Riot Reading Challenge: A superhero comic with a female lead

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book becoming a movie in 2017

The Romance Reader’s Guide to Life

I can’t quite pinpoint why this book took me so long to read. At one point I even marked at DNF on Goodreads. For one thing, it is slightly more violent than I had expected. Somehow I must have missed the murder portion of the book blurb. With that said, it isn’t a particularly violent book, just different than I had expected. Pretty sure I saw the pretty cover, read “pirate,” and skipped the rest of the description.

The Romance Reader’s Guide to Life by Sharon Pywell centers around two sisters- Lilly and Neave (which I never really figured out how to pronounce)- who are very close and very different. Lilly is flighty and interested in fun while Neave is awkward and prefers spending time with books to people, especially The Pirate Lover, a romance novel she took from an elderly neighbor.

As the two sisters grow older they start their own cosmetics business, in the same vein as Mary Kay and Avon, and Lilly finds herself involved with a charming and manipulative man. When she dies, it’s up to dead Lilly in the beyond, with the help of the old faithful family dog, to save Neave.

The story of Lilly and Neave is interspersed with chapters from the romance novel Neave reads over and over. I hate to admit this, since it shows you just how dense I can be, but I didn’t realize until the last few chapters that the plot of the The Pirate Lover and the main story mirror each other.

Appleblossom the Possum

Appleblossom the Possum by Holly Goldberg Sloan is one of this years Maud Hart Lovelace nominees. I’m going to try and read them all this year. I totally failed last year. It helps that many of them fulfill my other reading challenge categories.

The Goodreads blurb reads “Mama has trained up her baby possums in the ways of their breed, and now it’s time for all of them—even little Appleblossom—to make their way in the world. Appleblossom knows the rules: she must never be seen during the day, and she must avoid cars, humans, and the dreaded hairies (sometimes known as dogs). Even so, Appleblossom decides to spy on a human family—and accidentally falls down their chimney! The curious Appleblossom, her faithful brothers—who launch a hilarious rescue mission—and even the little girl in the house have no idea how fascinating the big world can be. But they’re about to find out!”

I should find this little book cute. But I didn’t. I may have mentioned a couple years ago that I lived in an old house and squirrels and one chipmunk managed to find their way inside. Finding chipmunk poop on your sofa is not cute. Ever since then these kinds of stories gross me out. I’m fine reading about the Possums outside, but once Appleblossom falls into the “people house” I was in yuck mode. Despite my aversions, the illustrations are adorable, and I can see kids really enjoying this book.

Popsugar Reading Challenge: A book from a nonhuman perspective

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt Storywalk

Last week I accomplished one of my professional goals. Since starting in public libraries I wanted to run a We’re Going on a Bear Hunt storywalk, through nature that somewhat resembles the scenes in the book. My current library is working on a partnership with a local nature center (we want more outreach, they want more visitors, so win-win!) and another librarian and I jumped at the chance to start this journey. I brought up my Bear Hunt idea and they loved it, and the site just happened to have a master naturalist volunteer who had already created a bear game, a bear den, and a box of bear paraphernalia (plaster prints, bear skin, etc). The nature center even has bears living on their property and have trail-cam photos of the bears.

Bear Hunt

I got to nature center at noon on a Wednesday and helped set up the non-trail portion of the event. We had a corner set up for kids to read to stuffed bears and a basket of other fabulous bear books. We also had a binocular making station, coloring sheets, and a “map” with early literacy tips for parents on the back.

Not only was I impressed by the turnout, but by how long some of our Bear Hunters took on their walk. Some were on the trail for an hour! They then stayed and made binoculars or colored or read for another hour or two.

I’m super excited to continue this partnership and hope that the upcoming nature storywalks are just as successful. And I was so excited to see something I’d thought about for years come to life.

Audacity Jones

I have to admit, the only reason I read this particular Kirby Larson book is because it has a cat on the cover. Which is a Popsugar Reading challenge category, and I don’t want to read a cozy mystery (which almost all seem to feature a cat of some kind.

I’m apparently on a spunky, spirited orphan kick recently. Audacity Jones has a very Anne Shirley personality, which showed most with her vocabulary and when talking about the books she’d read.

Audacity is the only orphan at Miss Maisie’s School for Wayward Girls, and as such is snapped up for help on a mission by the Commodore. At first Audacity is excited for her adventure, but soon she begins to suspect something, or someone, in the mission is amiss.

I can’t say I loved the book, which is surprising because I normally love historical fiction. And I remember enjoying other Kirby Larson books. This one felt like it was trying too hard. Again, I can’t say what it was trying too hard to do. There was just something “meh” about the whole thing.

PopSugar Reading Challenge: A book with a cat on the cover