Audio Books, and Why I Love Them

It’s no secret that I love audiobooks. I listen to one almost every day on my way to work and I always have a few Harry Potter books stored on my phone for those random times when the radio just won’t cut it. My husband and I drove up to my parents cabin for eelpout festival (only in Minnesota…) and found ourselves without familiar radio stations. Enter Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Harry Potter is great because we both love the books and can get into super detailed discussions regarding our favorite witches and wizards, but we can also get distracted and worry about maps and directions without losing our place or enjoyment in the book. However, given that we drove all around northern Minnesota, Harry Potter did not last the whole trip. Enter Looking for Alaska by John Green.

I figured my husband would enjoy it since he loves watching John Green’s youtube videos and enjoyed Paper Towns. And I was right! We haven’t finished it yet, so I can’t review it, but I can tell you it appeals to a wide(ish) audience and it is great for road trips. There is humor, depth, compassion for the characters, all while allowing the listener to tune out while establishing location and other important driving activities.

Anyway,  I have a point to this aside from telling you about how I pick my audiobooks when traveling with a certain someone. Many parents are under the impression that their children must read chapter books at their age level (no picture books allowed, but that’s another rant for another day), and they must READ them, not listen. However, there are so many benefits to listening to an audiobook! Denise Johnson lists in Reading Rockets the benefits of audiobooks. Benefits include, “introduce students to books above their reading level teach critical listening, introduce new genres that students might not otherwise consider, introduce new vocabulary or difficult proper names or locales, sidestep unfamiliar dialects or accents, provide a bridge to important topics of discussion for parents and children who can listen together while commuting to sporting events, music lessons, or on vacations.”

Audiobooks have also proved useful in helping struggling readers and language learners. From my own person experience, when listening to books I’ve already read (Harry Potter is a great example again), I notice things I missed while reading. Sometimes I get so wrapped up in the plot I forget to process what I read and can miss some great turns of phrase or foreshadowing or key points in character development.

Advertisements

One thought on “Audio Books, and Why I Love Them

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s