Toddler Storytime: Hats

Opening Song

The More We Get Together

Book:

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Red Hat by Lita Judge

Song:

Head Shoulders Knees and Toes

Book:

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Hooray for Hat by Brian Won

Action Rhyme:

“Here are Grandma’s Glasses”

Here are Grandma’s glasses. (make circles over eyes)

Here is Grandma’s cap. (place hands on head)

This is how she folders her hands,

And puts them in her lap. (hands folded in lap).

Here are Grandpa’s glasses. (make circles over eyes)

And here is Grandpa’s hat. (hands make big hat)

And this is how he folds his arms- (folds arms)

Then he takes a nap (hands under cheek) 

Feltboard:

“Little Bat”

Little bat, little bat, are you under the ______ hat?

I have colored and laminated copies of four different colored hats and a small bat. Before storytime I hid the bat and we talked about the hat colors etc.

Book:

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The Queen’s Hat by Steve Antony

Closing Song

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Airplane Reads

My husband and I flew out east for a wedding/leaf peeping trip (what a weird phrase, by the way) last weekend and I devoured two different YA books. YA books are the best for flying, I’ve found. At least the fluffy ones.

On the plane ride out I read The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith. A year or so ago I read This is What Happy Looks Like so I knew what I was getting into with Love at First Sight. The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight is the story of Hadley and Oliver, who meet by chance (Hadley missed her flight and was put on Oliver’s) at an airport and find themselves sitting next to each other on the trip from New York to London. As the title suggests, they fall in love. It’s a very sweet story, and exactly what I was looking for, so I forgave the too-quickly-wrapped-up-ending. The sweet love story and the angsty family drama play off each other nicely and I imagine would have been very appealing to teen me (it certainly appealed to adult me, so I have to assume).

On the plane ride back, I read Rebel Mechanics by Shanna Swendson and even downloaded the sequel, Rebel Magisters on overdrive during our layover. Rebel Mechanics introduces us to an alternate universe. What if the British ruling class were magic, and that’s why they controlled the colonies? If that happened the American Revolution would not have turned out the way we know it today. What if, the Industrial Revolution occurred because the non-magical people were finding ways to build machinery that would give them the same sort of power as the Magisters (the magical people)?

I don’t think I’ve ever officially read a Steampunk novel before and I loved the concept! The writing and the characters certainly left something to be desired. Which is unfortunate. Rebel Mechanics is a very clean and chaste YA novel. Not that all romances need bosom heaving, but this one seemed particularly full of romantic tension and I kept waiting for characters to make moves, and it was very frustrating. Kiss! Declare your feelings! At least hug. It doesn’t help that the characters themselves reminded me a lot of those found in The Pink Carnation series, which is for adults and therefore the romance has more adult content. So with that comparison in mind, I kept waiting for things to happen (that never did).

My guess is that Rebel Mechanics did not perform well sales wise, as according to Goodreads, the sequel was self-published. And you can tell. Although that didn’t stop me from reading the two books in two days.

I originally checked out The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight and Rebel Mechanics for the “book with a red spine” category on the PopSugar Reading Challenge. In the end, I used The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight for the “book involving travel” category, Rebel Mechanics for the “book with a red spine category” and Rebel Magisters for “a steampunk novel.”  

I believe I originally had Rich People Problems as my “book involving travel,” but The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight seemed more fitting. I like to play around with the categories as I read and fill in the slots. So many can fit for so many different categories!

Baby Storytime: 25

Opening Song

Action Rhyme:

“Open Them, Shut Them”

Book:

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Oh, Daddy! by Bob Shea

Song:

Itsy Bitsy Spider

Action Rhyme:

“There Was a Little Mouse”

There was a little mouse, (gently tickle child)

Looking for his house, (gently tickle child)

Not here, (gently tickle child)

Not here, (gently tickle child)

But here, here, here! (tickle tummy)

Shared Book

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Snuggle Puppy by Sandra Boynton

Action Rhyme:

“Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear”

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, turn around,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, touch the ground,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, show your shoes,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, I love you.

(Most of my babies are on the older end for babystorytime so they’re practically toddlers, but this is easily adapted for baby babies i.e. caregiver hold the baby while standing, caregiver twist baby in lap instead of turning all around etc.)

Action Rhyme:

“Eye Winker”

Eye winker, (point to eyes)

Tom Tinker, (point to ears)

Nose smeller, (point to nose)

Mouth eater, (point to mouth)

Chin chopper, (tap chin)

Chin chopper, (tap chin)

Chin chopper, (tap chin)

Chin chopper, chin. (tickle under chin)

Book:

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Stanley the Builder by William Bee

Action Rhyme:

“Here are Grandma’s Glasses”

Here are Grandma’s glasses. (make circles over eyes)

Here is Grandma’s cap. (place hands on head)

This is how she folders her hands,

And puts them in her lap. (hands folded in lap).

Here are Grandpa’s glasses. (make circles over eyes)

And here is Grandpa’s hat. (hands make big hat)

And this is how he folds his arms- (folds arms)

Then he takes a nap (hands under cheek) 

Closing Song

I Hate Everyone But You

I have many thoughts on I Hate Everyone But You by Gaby Dunn and Allison Raskin, so let’s see if I can make sense of them.

Told in a series of texts and emails it was hard to distinguish characters at first. Once I got over that I got sucked in to the story. On the one hand, nobody is a particularly likable person and the love interests are pretty terrible. However, at 18 you aren’t always a very nice person and we all make questionable romantic choices at first. Both Gen and Ava are relatable in their own way (one has anxiety and some other mental health concerns, while the other is discovering her sexuality and the queer community) and the novel addresses issues that many teens are facing/will face as they mature in a way I don’t think many other novels address.

The only downside (or I suppose you could say it’s a positive) is that without chapters there’s no good stopping point. Because of this I ended reading the whole thing in one day.

Gaby and Allison also have a pretty popular YouTube channel, which I tried watching after reading, and I have to say, I like the book a lot more.

Toddler Storytime: Clouds

Opening Song

The More We Get Together

Book:

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It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles G. Shaw

Action Rhyme:

Where is Thumbkin?

Song:

Itsy Bitsy Spider

Book

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Little Cloud by Eric Carle

Action Rhyme:

“I’m a Little Cloud” (to the tune of I’m a Little Tea Pot)

I’m a little cloud, in the sky (have fingertips meet in circle above head)

You can find me way up high (stretch arms and stand on tippy toes)

Sometimes I’m puffy (put hands on hips to make you “puffy”)

Sometimes stretched out (hands at sides)

I just love to float about (move side to side with hands stretched out)

Parachute Activity

“Mr. Sun”

Placed colored scarves on the parachute as our clouds and sang “Oh Mr. Sun, Sun, Mr. Golden Sun, Please shine down on me” multiple times (fast, slow, bouncing the clouds, under the parachute etc)

Closing Song

When the Moon is Low

This one took me a loooooong time to listen to. Started it in April then finished it in October.

When the Moon is Low by Nadia Hashimi is about a family in Afghanistan who become a target of the Taliban regime. Forced to flee with forged papers, Fereiba’s only goal is to bring her children to her sister’s in London when the unthinkable happens: her son, Saleem is separated from the rest of the family.

The beginning of the book was wonderful. All about Fereiba’s youth in Afghanistan and the rise of the Taliban. It was fascinating! I learned so much! It helps that the narrator (Sneha Mathan) has a beautiful voice. However, the narration suddenly switches to Saleem’s story, which makes sense by the end, but the transition felt so forced at the time. We had so much time invested in Fereiba’s story– from her youth to adulthood– that to switch to a new voice, with very little background on the character outside his mother’s observations was odd. Also, Neil Shah’s voice seemed particularly grating after Sneha’s.

Like I said, the narration switch eventually makes sense, but it threw me off, and I took a loooong break from listening for a while. Once I got back into the swing of the story it was fine. Although I do think it ended rather abruptly given the amount of buildup and background on Fereiba.